Frequently Asked Questions 

Dr. Glenn Corneil answers three of the most frequently asked questions on boosters: https://youtu.be/kB_x2DZlOGo

Full text of this video can be found here: https://www.timiskaminghu.com/90555/Full-text-of-this-video-script 

  • Why are there so many boosters needed for the COVID-19 vaccine? 
  • If you have already had COVID-19, why do you need to get vaccinated or get a booster?
  • Why are so many people still getting COVID-19 even after three doses?  

I’ve already had COVID-19 and recovered. Do I still need to get the vaccine? 

Yes, you should still get vaccinated. It’s important for most of the population to get vaccinated to help stop the spread of the virus. Even if you’ve recovered from COVID-19, you are not immune and can still get the virus, be contagious while not showing any symptoms, and spread it to others in your community who are not yet immunized. With the spread of new variants, including the highly transmissible Omicron variant, it is important that you get vaccinated to protect yourself and those around you from serious illness, hospitalization and death.

Learn more:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcJfwWkfcZ8 (Youtube video)

What is the suggested timing between a previous COVID-19 infection and COVID-19 vaccination? 

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization and the Government of Ontario recommend that COVID-19 vaccines should be offered to people who have previously had COVID-19. Immunity from an infection may not last and you can get COVID-19 again. You can get the vaccine as soon as your symptoms are resolved and you have finished self-isolation. The vaccine is safe after a recent COVID-19 infection.

They suggest that you receive your vaccines with this timing:

  • If you have not received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, it is still recommended even if you already had COVID-19. Although you can get the vaccine as soon as your symptoms are resolved and you have finished self-isolation, research suggests that the best immune response is 8 weeks after your COVID-19 infection. 
  • If you are immunocompromised and have not received your second or third dose, it is still recommended that you complete your vaccination series, even if you already had COVID-19. Although you can get the vaccine as soon as your symptoms are resolved and you have finished self-isolation, research suggests that the best immune response is 8 weeks after your COVID-19 infection.
  • If you have not received your third dose, a booster dose is still recommended, even if you already had COVID-19. Although you can get the vaccine as soon as your symptoms are resolved and you have finished self-isolation, research suggests that the best immune response is 12 weeks after your COVID-19 infection.
Learn more: COVID-19 Vaccine Administration Guidance

What is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The COVID-19 vaccine aims to prevent illness and limit transmission of the virus. Safe and reliable vaccines can help protect you and your family from COVID-19.

They will be an important tool to help stop the spread of the virus and allow individuals, families and workers to safely resume normal life. The coronavirus (COVID-19covid 19) vaccine does not cause a coronavirus infection. It helps to build up your immunity to the virus, so your body will fight it off more easily if it affects you.

After independent and thorough scientific reviews for safety, efficacy and quality, Health Canada has approved four vaccines for use in Canada:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech – approved on December 9, 2020
  • Moderna – approved on December 23, 2020
  • AstraZeneca – approved on February 26, 2021
  • Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) – approved on March 5, 2021

Understanding how COVID-19covid 19 vaccines are approved, how they work and possible side effects is important.

Get vaccine facts and vaccine safety information in multiple languages.

Learn about vaccine safety

I have heard that the COVID-19 vaccine was approved quickly. Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe?

Yes, the COVID-19 vaccine is safe for use in approved populations. Due to the ongoing pandemic, Health Canada conducted an expediated, or rolling, approval process. This means that the vaccine was evaluated for safety and efficacy while it was being developed, and again when it was finalized. Though faster, all of the components of a routine approvals process were addressed. For more information, please watch the video linked below:

What are the differences between the vaccines?

For information on the differences between the vaccines, visit:  https://www.timiskaminghu.com/default.aspx?content_id=90513&website_language_id=3#CV-19Vaccines 

Did the clinical trials include people of different races and ethnicities?

Yes. Of the clinical trials for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, approximately 42% of global participants and 30% of participants from the United States of America have racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds. Pfizer-BioNTech has created an infographic that highlights the breakdown of participants by background and age.

Can the COVID-19 vaccine cause COVID-19 infection?

No, the COVID-19 vaccine cannot cause a COVID-19 infection. The COVID-19 vaccines currently approved do not use live components of the virus. This means that it is impossible for them to cause COVID-19 infection.

Why should i get vaccinated if COVID-19 has a high survival rate?

COVID-19 can be a serious illness for many people, including those who are young and were previously healthy. Symptoms can persist for months, and the virus can damage the heart, brain and lungs. Getting COVID-19 can also increase the risk of long-term health problems.

The potential short-term side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are worth the protection it will provide you and may also help stop the spread to others.

COVID-19 Vaccine Resources

Provincial Resources

Government of Ontario

Public Health Ontario: Welcome | Public Health Ontario 

Ministry of Health and Ministry of Long-Term Care: COVID-19 Vaccine-Relevant Information and Planning Resources

Federal Resources

Government of Canada

National Advisory Council on Immunization (NACI)): Statements and publications - Canada.ca

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC): Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak updates, symptoms, prevention, travel, preparation - Canada.ca

Video Resources

Downloadable Resources

 

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